Day of the dead

A reflection of love and culture. The day of the Dead is a Mexican tradition celebrated on November 1st and 2nd. Its origins are related to Mesoamerican times, although nowadays it joins with religion and the authentic Mexican culture.

 

It is a day to celebrate life, but overall it is a day to honor the dead. 

 

We dedicate this time to our loved ones who died; the tradition dictates that their spirits are allowed to visit the living world for only one day a year, so, we prepare an altar especially to

welcome them. 

 

The altar should have their favorite meals and beverages; flowers, candles, fruits, pan de muerto, sweets, mole, tamale, and tequila are popular items on the altar, of course, these items could be different depending on the likes of the person that the altar is dedicated to. 

Only the souls that haven't been forgotten could come to the party. 

Altars are created at home and it’s like having a party, with the children helping mom to cook the meals and changing the dishes during the day, we all hear and share stories about our deads and our family. Visiting the cemetery is the other part of this tradition, families clean and decorate their loving ones' graves with flowers and candles. 

WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.04.57 AM

Celebrating this day it's experiencing true love, cherishing that the FAMILY belongs to our heart    .

While there are some optional items for the altar, there are also elements that are basic for our dead can visit us successfully, such as incense, saints, the person's picture, water, fire, ashes, salt, a Xoloitzcuintle dog, personal items such as an instrument, a t-shirt, a hat, anything that was connected to that person, cempasúchil flowers, copal resin, the arch at the top decorated with flowers, and sweet skulls representing the death.

WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.00
WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.00

WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.18
WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.18

WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 10.53
WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 10.53

WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.00
WhatsApp Image 2020-11-02 at 11.00

1/6

Altar de muertos at Coldwell Banker Riveras - Los Barriles office by Araceli Vargas and Priscilla Durán.

All of them have a purpose and a meaning, such as Salt, for the dead bodies so they can resist the trip between both worlds, Skulls, sugar, chocolate, amaranth skulls in all sizes are there to remind death is always present, and it's an inevitable passage from this world to the mystical one.  Copal resin was offered by the natives to their gods. It is the element that sublimates prayer. It is used to cleanse the place from evil spirits so the soul can enter your home without suffering any danger.

This is one of our favorite elements, the Xoloitzcuintle Dog;  this dog represents the God Xólotl, it is said the dog will help the souls to cross the Itzcuintlán river, the last step to reach Mictlán, which is the underworld for the Mexicas. Don't forget the Arch, since it represents the entrance to the world of the dead and it's decorated with Cempasúchil flowers (marigold); their name comes from the Nahuatl "Cempasúchil" which means "twenty flowers" or "several flowers". They were considered by the Mexicas as a symbol of death and life.

This is a day for fun too! A fun way to celebrate this day is writing a literary calaverita, which is a Mexican traditional composition in verse. They are often written for this special occasion, using the name of our friends or family we compose a verse to make fun of the death.

This beautiful tradition was declared by UNESCO as Mexican patrimony; If you are interested in learning more about the meaning of this celebration, we recommend you to watch COCO the movie, this great animated fantasy film that was produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures, shows us how important is for our loved ones to be remembered and for the living ones to keep honoring our family during the years. 

eu_coco_7things_hero_m_ce02958d.webp